Future features coming to Tableau 10.2 and beyond – that they didn’t blog about

Having slowly de-jetlagged from this year’s (fantastic and huge) Tableau conference, I’d settled down to write up my notes regarding the always-thrilling “what new features are on the cards?” sessions, only to note that Tableau have already done a pretty good job of summarising it on their own blog here, here and here.

There’s little point in my replicating that list verbatim, but I did notice that a few things that I’d noted down from the keynote announcements that weren’t immediately obvious in Tableau’s blog posts. I have listed some of those for below for reference. Most are just fine details, but one or two seem more major to me.

Per the conference, I’ll divide this up into “probably coming soon” vs “1-3 year vision”.

Coming soon:

Select from tooltip – a feature that will no doubt seem like it’s always been there as soon as we get it.

We can already customise tool tips to show pertinent information about a data point that don’t influence the viz itself. For example, if we’re scatter-plot analysing sales and profit per customer, perhaps we’d like to show whether the customer is a recent customer vs a long term customer in the tool tip when hovered over.

In today’s world, as you hover over a particular customer’s datapoint, the tooltip indeed may tell you that it’s a recent customer. But what’s the pattern in the other datapoints that are also recent customers?

In tomorrow’s world you’ll be able to click where it tells you “recent customer” and all the other “recent customers” in the viz will be highlighted. It’s nothing that you can’t get the same end result today with the use of the highlighter tool, but likely far more convenient in certain situations..

A couple of new web-authoring features, to add to the list on the official blog post.

  1. You can create storypoints on the web
  2. You’ll be able to enable full-screen mode on the web

Legends per measure: this might not sound all that revolutionary, but when you think it through, it enables this sort of classic viz: a highlighted table on multiple measures – where each measure is highlighted independently of the others.

legendpermeasure.PNG
Having average sales of £10000 doesn’t any more have to mean that the high customer age of 100 in the same table is highlighted as though it was tiny.

Yes, there are workarounds to make something that looks similar to the above today – but it’s one of those features that I have found those people yet to be convinced of the merits of Tableau react negatively to when it turns out it’s not a simple operation, after they compare it to other tools (Excel…). Whilst recreating what you made in another tool is often exactly the wrong approach to using a new tool, this type of display is one of the few I see a good case for making easy enough to create.

In the 1-3 year future:

Tableau’s blog does talk about the new super-fast data engine, Hyper, but doesn’t dwell on one cool feature that was demoed on stage.

Creating a Tableau extract is sometimes a slow process. Yes, Hyper should make it faster, but at the end of the day there are factors like remote database performance and network speed that might mean there’s simply no practical way to speed it up.  Today you’re forced to sit and stare at the extract creation process until it’s done.

Hyper, though, can do its extract-making process in the background, and let you use it piece-by-piece, as it becomes available.

So if you’re making an extract of sales from the last 10 years, but so far only the information from the last 5 years has arrived to the extract creation engine, you can already start visualising what happened in the last 5 years. Of course you’ll not be able to see years 6-10 at the moment, as it’s still winging its way to you through the wifi. But you can rest safe in the knowledge that once the rest of the data has arrived it’ll automatically update your charts to show the full 10 year range. No more excuses for long lunches, sorry!

It seems to me that this, and features like incremental refresh, also open the door to enabling near real-time analysis within an extract.

Geographic augmentation – Tableau can plot raw latitude and longitude points with ease. But in practice, they are just x-y points shown over a background display; there’s no analytical concept present that point x,y is part of the state of Texas whereas point y,z is within New York. But there will be. Apparently we will be able to roll up long/lat pairs to geographic components like zip, state, and so on, even when the respective dimension doesn’t appear in the data.

Web authoring – the end goal is apparently that you’ll be able to do pretty much everything you can do publishing-wise in Tableau Desktop on the web. In recent times, each iteration has added more and more features – but in the longer term, the aim is to get to absolute parity.

We were reassured that this doesn’t mean that the desktop product is going away; it’s simply a different avenue of usage, and the two technologies will auto-sync so that you could start authoring on your desktop app, and then log into a website from a different computer and your work will be there waiting for you, without the need to formally  publish it.

It will be interesting to see whether, and how, this affects licensing and pricing as today there is a large price differential between for instance a Tableau Online account and Tableau Desktop Professional, at least in year one.

And finally, some collaboration features on Tableau server.

The big one, for me, is discussions (aka comments).  Right alongside any viz when published will be a discussion pane. The intention is that people will be able to comment, ask questions, explain what’s shown and so on.

But, doesn’t Tableau Server already have this? Well, yes, it does have comments, but in my experience they have not been greatly useful to many people.

The most problematic issue in my view has been the lack of notifications. That is to say,  a few months after publishing a delightful dashboard, a user might have a question about a what they’re seeing and correctly pop a comment on the page displaying the viz. Great.

But the dashboard author, or whichever SME might actually be able to answer the question, isn’t notified in any way.  If they happen to see that someone commented by chance, then great, they can reply (note that the questioner will not be notified that someone left them an answer though). But, unless we mandate everyone in the organisation to manually check comments on every dashboard they have access to every day, that’s rather unlikely to be the case.

And just opening the dashboard up may not even be enough, as today they tend to be displayed “below the fold” for any medium-large sized dashboard. So comments go unanswered, and people get grumpy and stop commenting, or never notice that they can even comment.

The new system however will include @user functionality, which will email the user when a comment or question has been directed at them.  I’m also hoping that you’ll be able to somehow subscribe to dashboards, projects or the server such that you get notified if any comments are left that you’re entitled to see , whether or not you’re mentioned in them.

As they had it on the demo at least, the comments also show on the right hand side of the dashboard rather than below it – which given desktop users tend to have wide rather than tall screens should makes them more visible. They’ll also be present in the mobile app in future.

Furthermore, each time a comment is made, the server will store and show the state of the visualisation at that time, so that future readers can see exactly what the commenter was looking at when they made their comments. This will be great for the very many dashboards that are set up to autorefresh or allow view customisation.

Conversation.PNG

(My future comment wishlist #1: ability to comment on an individual datapoint, and have that comment shown wherever that datapoint is seen).

Lastly, sandboxes. Right now, my personal experience has been that there’s not a huge incentive to publish work-in-progress to a Tableau server in most cases. Depending on your organisation’s security setup, anything you publish might automatically become public before you’re ready, and even if not, then unless you’re pretty careful with individual permissions it can be the case that you accidentally share your file too widely, or not widely enough, and/or end up with a complex network of individually-permissioned files that are easy to get mixed up.

Besides, if you always operate from the same computer, there’s little advantage (outside of backups) to publishing it if you’re not ready for someone else to look at it. But now, with all this clever versioning, recommendy, commenty, data-alerty stuff, it becomes much more interesting to do so.

So, there will apparently be a user sandbox; a private area on the server where each Tableau user can upload and work on their files, safe in the knowledge that what they do there is private – plus they can customise which dashboards, metrics and so on are shown when they enter their sandbox.

But, better yet, team sandboxes! So, in one click, you’ll be able to promote your dashboard-in-progress to a place where just your local analytics team can see it, for instance, and get their comments, feedback and help developing it, without having to fiddle around with setting up pseudo-projects or separate server installations for your team.

Furthermore, there was mention of a team activity newsfeed, so you’ll be able to see what your immediate team members have been up to in the team sandbox since you last took a peek. This should be helpful for raising awareness of what each team member is working on high, further enhancing the possibilities for collaboration and reducing the likelihood of duplicate work.

Finally, it’s mentioned on Tableau’s blogs, but I wanted to extend a huge cheer and many thanks for the forthcoming data driven alerting feature! Lack of this style of alerting and insufficient collaboration features were the two most common complaints I have heard about Tableau Server from people considering the purchase of something that can be decidedly non-trivial in cost. Other vendors have actually gone so far as to sell add-on products to try and add these features to Tableau Server, many of which are no doubt very good -but it’s simply impossible to integrate them into the overall Tableau install as seamlessly as Tableau themselves could do.

Now we’re in 2016, where the average Very Important And Busy Executive feels like they don’t have time to open up a dashboard to see where things stand, it’s a common and obvious feature request to want to be alerted only when there is actually something to worry about – which may then result in opening the dashboard proper to exploring what’s going on. And, I have no doubt, creative analysts are going to find any number of uses to put it to outside of the obvious “let me know if my sales are poor today”.

(My future data driven alert wishlist #1: please give include a trigger to the effect of “if this metric has an unusual value”, meaning to base it on a statistical calculation derived from on historic variance/std dev/ etc. rather than having to put a flat >£xxxx in as criteria).

What people claim to believe: Hillary Clinton edition

Back to political opinion polls today I’m afraid. Yep, the UK’s Brexit is all done and dusted (haha) but now our overseas friends seem to be facing what might be an even more unlikely choice in the grand US presidential election 2016.

Luckily, the pollsters are on hand to guide us through the inner minds and intentions of the voters-to-be. At last glance, it was looking pretty good for a Clinton victory -although, be not complacent ye Democrats, given the lack of success in the field of polling with regards to the afore-mentioned Brexit or perhaps the 2015 General Election here in the UK.

Below is perhaps my favourite most terrifying poll of recent times. It’s a recent poll carried out by the organisation “Public Policy Polling” concerning residents of the state of Florida. As usual, they asked several questions about the respondents’ characteristics and viewpoints, which lets us divide up the responses into those coming from Clinton supporters vs those coming from Trump supporters.

There are many insidious facts one could elucidate here on both sides, but given that at the moment the main polls are very in favour of a Clinton win (but see previous comment re complacency…), let’s pick out some that might hold relevance in a world where Clinton semi-landslides to victory.

Firstly, it shouldn’t particularly matter, but one can’t help but notice that Clinton is of the female persuasion. But, hey, rational voters look at policies, competence, experience or similar attributes, so a basic demographic fact alone doesn’t matter, right?

Wrong: the survey shows that just 69% of all respondents thought that gender didn’t make a difference. And, predictably, twice as many thought that the US would be better off with a male president than those who thought it would be better of with a female president. The effect is notably strongest within Trump supporters, where nearly 20x the proportion of people think the US would be better with a male president than with a female one.

manorwoman

Now, I can imagine some kind of halo effect where it’s hard for people to totally differentiate “my favourite candidate is a man and I can’t imagine having a favourite candidate that is not like him” from “my favourite candidate is a man but the fact he happens to be a man is incidental”.

But that nearly 40% of Trump supporters here claim that generically the president should be a man (implying that if it was Ms Trump vs Mr Clinton, they might vote differently), it seems potentially a stronger signal of inequality than that, especially when compared to the lower bias between Clinton supporters and preferring a woman – which is equally as illogical, but at least has a lower incidence. We can note also a pro-male bias in the “not sure” population too.

Of course we don’t actually have an example of what the US is like when it has a female president, because none of the 43 serving presidents to date have been women.

But we do know part of what Hilary Clinton is already presidentially responsible for apparently. “Coincidentally” (hmm…) her husband was one of the previous 43 male presidents, and apparently the majority of Trump supporters think it’s perfectly right to hold her responsible for his “behaviour”.

Yep, anything he did, for good or bad (which, let’s face it, is probably biased towards the bad for those people who support the opposing party and/or don’t appreciate cheating spouses) is in some sense his wife’s fault, for the Trumpians.

responsible

But if she’s so obviously bad, then why does she actually poll quite well, at the time of writing? Well, of course there can be only one reason. The whole election is a fraud. And given we haven’t actually had the election yet, I guess the allegation must also entail that poll respondents are also lying about their intentions, and/or that all the publishers of polls are equally as corrupt as the electoral system of the US.

rigged

Yes, THREE-QUARTERS of Trump supporters polled here apparently believe that if, as seems quite likely, Clinton wins then it can only be because the election was rigged. The whole democratic process is a sham. The US has fallen prey to semi-visible forces of uber-powerful corruption. We should presumably therefore ignore the result and give Trump the golden throne (to fit inside his golden house). Choice of winner aside, this is a pretty scary indictment on the respect that citizens feel for their own democratic system. This is not to say whether they are right or wrong to feel this way; to us Brits, I think it sometimes seems that in the US money has even greater hold over some theoretically democratic outcomes in the US than it does over here – but that so many have so little regard for the system is surely…a concern.

But wait, it’s not just that she may hypothetically commit electoral fraud in the near future. She has apparently already committed crimes serious enough that she should already be locked up in prison.

prison

Over EIGHTY PERCENT of Trump supporters polled here think she should literally go to prison; and this isn’t predicated on her winning. Well, there’s no shortage of bad things that can be laid at her door I’m sure, she has after all been serving at a high level of politics for a while already and, without being an expert, it seems like there are many serious allegations that people lay at the Clintons’ feet. But it’s perhaps quite surprising that the large majority of her opponent’s supporters want to throw someone who is likely to be their next president in jail. I don’t think even the Blair war-crimes movement ever got quite that far!

Unless…well. I’m only sad they didn’t ask the same question about Trump. Perhaps we could be more at ease if at least the same proportion of people thought he should be locked up. An oft overlooked fact is that analysis is often meaningless without some sort of carefully-chosen comparison. Perhaps there’s a baseline figure of people that think any given prominent politician should be jailed (but I’ve not seen research on that).

It’s hard to imagine though that the fact Trump has himself actually appeared to threaten her with jail doesn’t play some role here with his supporters though. It is apparently unprecedented for a major party nominee to have said publicly that his opponent should be jailed – but say it he did, most famously during their second presidential debate. As the Guardian reports:

Trump, embracing the spirit of the “lock her up” mob chants at his rallies, threatened: “If I win I am going to instruct my attorney general to get a special prosecutor to look into your situation – there has never been so many lies and so much deception,” he threatened.

Clinton said it was “awfully good” that someone with the temperament of Trump was not in charge of the law in the country, provoking another Trump jab: “Because you’d be in jail.”

Eric Holder, who once was the US attorney general, didn’t really seem to like that plan.

So we’ve established that in the eyes of the average Florida Trump supporter polled here that if Clinton wins then the whole shebang was fraudulent, she already should have been locked up in prison, and, besides, the fact that she’s a women should probably ban her from applying to the office of the president in the first place. That’s a strong indictment. But, of course, there’s another level to explore.

Is Hillary Clinton a malevolent paranormal entity, intent on destroying humankind?

demon

Erm…2 out of every 5 Trump supporters here think yes, she definitely is an actual demon. And the majority aren’t sure that she is not an actual demon.

Even only just over 50% of the “not sure” supporters are also sure she’s not an actual demon. It’s also entertaining to contemplate the c. 10% of her supports that think she might be demonic yet still fancy her as president.

The lower figures might be down to some variant of the excellent StarSlateCodex’s concept of the “Lizardman’s Constant” which can perhaps be summed up as there’s a lower bound % of people who will believe, or claim to believe, any polled sentiment.

But there they benchmark that at around 4%, and ten times that proportion of Trump supporters here respond that they are certain that Clinton is a literal demon. There are many ways to introduce biases that lead to this sort of result, which StarSlateCodex does go over. But 40% is…big…if this poll is even remotely respectable.

So, where has this idea that she’s a demon come from? Have Trump supporters as a collective seen some special evidence that proves this must be true, that somehow the rest of us have overlooked? Surely each individual doesn’t randomly become subject to these thoughts which even believers would probably term an unusual state of affairs -is there no smoke without fire? (pun intended)

Well, perhaps it has something to do with a subset of famous-enough people have stated that she is.

Trump himself did refer to her as a devil, although in fairness that just maybe possibly might be an unfortunate turn of phrase, if we want to be charitable. After all, to his credit, evidence suggests he’s not great at following a script (or at least not one you’d imagine a typical political spinner would write).

Perhaps more pertinently, for certain a certain subsection of viewers anyway, is presenter Alex Jones of “Infowars” fame (a website that apparently gets more monthly visitors than e.g. the Economist or Newsweek), he who Trump says of “your reputation is amazing…I will not let you down”, who did go on a bit of a rant on this subject.

MediaMatters have kindly transcribed:

She is an abject, psychopathic, demon from Hell that as soon as she gets into power is going to try to destroy the planet. I’m sure of that, and people around her say she’s so dark now, and so evil, and so possessed that they are having nightmares, they’re freaking out… I mean this woman is dangerous, ladies and gentleman. I’m telling you, she is a demon. This is Biblical.

There’s so much more if you’re into that sort of stuff; see it all on this video, including the physical evidence he presents of Clinton’s demonness (spoiler alert: she smells bad, and Obama is obviously one too because sometimes flies land on him).

Unfortunately I’m not aware of time series data on perception of Clinton’s level of demonicness – so I’m afraid there’s no temporal analysis to present on causal factors here.

At first glance some of this might seem kind of amusing in a macabre way – especially to us foreigners for whom the local political process is hugely less pleasant or equitable than it should be, but it doesn’t usually come with claims of supernatural possession. But the outcome may not be so funny. In the likely (but not certain) event that Clinton wins, Florida at least seems to have a significant bunch of people who think the whole debacle was rigged, and Clinton should have a gender change, an exorcism and a long spell in jail before even being considered for for the presidency.

Update 1: this sort of stuff probably doesn’t help matters – from former Congressmen / Radio host Joe Walsh:

Update 2: the polls are a lot closer now then they were when I started writing.