Creating my first Tableau web data connector – part 2

Now for the next part of the creating-a-web-data-connector journey: previously, I had got all the software I needed to create a web data connector installed (well, to be fair Notepad comes with Windows so that wasn’t hard) and designed my user interface.

Now it was time to move on to Tableau tutorial section 5 – using the information retrieved from the user of my UI in order to have Tableau connect to the BoardGameGeek API and retrieve the relevant data for analysis.

I read through the Tableau WDC tutorial, and, using some previous programming-other-stuff knowledge, realised that this tutorial was a mix of explaining the fundamentals of connecting to a generic web data connector, and explaining some very specific details of the example Yahoo finance web data connector the example showed.

The first thing to do then was to determine which bits were essential for my simple attempt and which were only there to facilitate the specific Yahoo API.

  • The “code for defining columns” section is obviously important. I need columns to put my data in.
  • The Yahoo Query YQL less so – my API is nothing to do with Yahoo.
  • The helper functions (buildUri, getFormattedDate,makeTwoDigits), no, these are just functions to help construct the YQL query needed to access their example API. It’s great to know that it’s possible to use helper functions like this if needed, but chances are, if I did need some, they’d not be the same unless my API was very similar to their Yahoo example.
  • The “code to get stock data”, well, I don’t want stock data, but I do want some sort of data so obviously some of that’s going to be relevant, so I pasted that into my file as-is, noting from the code that some of it was clearly going to need to be replaced given I don’t want boring finance data when exciting boardgames data is available instead.

It seemed obvious that providing the weblink to my API of choice -http://boardgamegeek.com/xmlapi2/collection?username=[whatever] – was going to be key.  So I replaced their connectionURI  code with a simple text variable of that, using the user-supplied BGG username I had got from the previous part.

connectionUri = 'http://boardgamegeek.com/xmlapi2/collection?username=' + bggUsername

 

(a URI is a Uniform Resource Identifier)

Of course this wasn’t going to be enough to make it work – I have not yet told Tableau what data I want it to receive and how to format it – but figured I’d run it through the simulator and see what happened. Nothing especially good did. But I did learn about “CORS”.

Now, again, no particular error messages tend to pop up by default even when things go fatally wrong in the simulator . It might look like it hung, it might go blank or similar, but no friendly message.

Lesson learned: If you are working with the super-basic tools I had at hand, what you need then is the built in developer tools Chrome has which you can bring up by pressing Ctrl Shift + I together. Switch it to show the “Console” tab, and you might see an error message there to help you out, if you’re lucky.

Here’s what I saw:

Untitled picture

Now, it’s been a long time since I did any serious web developing, and I had never suffered an Access-Control-Allow-Origin problem before. A swift bit of Googling led me to this nice explanation where I learnt that it’s a security feature “implemented in browsers to restrict interaction between documents (or scripts) that have different origins”. That makes sense; I don’t own either the BoardGameGeek site nor Github, I’m sad to say.

Of the 3 solutions that Jvaneyck suggests, it seemed like if I could find a JSONP source for my API instead of the XML one then that would be simplest, given I have no control over either server nor intention of building any infrastructure. So, can I get the BoardGameGeek API in JSONP format? Well, another quick Google ™ let me to a post on the BoardGameGeek forum, where a kind user named strathmeyer had offered up “Ajax-ready BGG API for any web programmers out there”.

The best thing is that I’ve enabled CORS headers, so you can use the API straight from the web browser

Yes, here indeed that was the best thing! Access-Control-Allow-Origin issue solved, and all thanks to the work of someone else 🙂

Lesson learned: I later found that Tableau 1) has a whole page dedicated to this exact problem, and 2) there’s an example in their SDK of various methods to get around this issue when connecting to XML. So next time, I should probably RT original M before going Google crazy.

But for now, all I needed to do was change the URI I pointed to from my web data connector to:

connectionUri = 'http://bgg-api.herokuapp.com/api/v1/collection?username=' + bggUsername

I ran that through the simulator once more, of course not expecting it to work before I had defined what data I was actually after – but it did eliminate the previous error message so I knew things were moving on nicely.

So when it ran through, Ctrl Shift + I back into Chrome to bring up the inspector and saw this message.

Untitled picture

My variable is not defined?! Where did it go? Oops, my fault, I’d embedded a previous function in this one. I needed to be more careful with my bracket-pasting finger. But it was simplicity itself to move the code back to where it should be, and re-simulate.

 

Untitled picture

OK, “uncaught invariant violation” is perhaps a little cryptic, but it’s sounds like it’s talking about having found something it didn’t expect. That could be my data (spoiler: it was). So now I needed to tell it what to expect and what to do with it.

Tune back in, same place, different time, for the exciting conclusion!

 

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